Places & Spaces at CDC Museum

January 25 - June 17, 2016

From January 25 to June 17, 2016, the David J. Sencer CDC Museum will feature the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibit, a collection of visualizations that tell stories compelling to both specialists and generalists alike. In keeping with its commitment to public health education and disease prevention, the CDC Museum has selected an exhibit that demonstrates the power of data visualization to confront many of society’s most significant challenges.


David J. Sencer CDC Museum

For over a decade, the Places & Spaces exhibit has collected science maps and visualization tools from leading international experts in the natural, physical, and social sciences but also from industry and government. By helping audiences grasp the abstract concepts, relationships, and dynamism of complex systems, the exhibit promotes more informed, effective decision making on the part of private individuals, industry practitioners, public policymakers, and others.

Dr. Robin Wagner, Chief Science Officer for the Office of Public Health Scientific Services, attests to science mapping’s capacity to aid comprehension and inspire action: “CDC uses maps to better understand patterns and relationships between environmental, social and personal risk factors, and diseases and injuries over time and space. Visualizations can make it easier for CDC to take faster, better actions to protect the public’s health. This is why the David J. Sencer CDC Museum, in partnership with the CDC Office of Public Health Scientific Services, is pleased to host Places & Spaces: Mapping Science.

Two special events have been scheduled in conjunction with the exhibit’s residency. On February 4 from 5 to 6 p.m., Places & Spaces curator Katy Börner will deliver the inaugural lecture, “Data Visualizations—Drawing Actionable Insights from Data.” Dr. Börner’s talk will be followed on February 5 by a scientific symposium entitled “Seeing for Action—Using Maps and Graphs to Protect the Public’s Health,” which will take place from 1:30-4:30 p.m. The symposium will provide an opportunity for researchers from government, industry, and academia to discuss the rich potential of visualization tools to communicate public health threats and lead to more efficient responses.

Both events will be held on the CDC headquarters campus in Auditorium A, CDC Tom Harkin Global Communications Center (Building 19) 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027. Please note that registration for these events is required. Non-U.S. citizens (including permanent residents) must register by January 4, 2016, to allow enough time for the CDC to process their security clearance. Registration forms may be found at http://goo.g./forms/I6S59AqZrA. Additional questions regarding these events can be directed to Ms. Laura Mann at kve7@cdc.gov.

Venue:

David J. Sencer CDC Museum
1600 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA 30329

David J. Sencer CDC Museum, in association with the Smithsonian Institution — Visit CDC's David J. Sencer CDC Museum




Special Events

Thursday, February 4 – Opening Reception. Katy Börner, curator of Places & Spaces will will deliver the inaugural lecture, “Data Visualizations—Drawing Actionable Insights from Data.”
Friday, February 5 - Scientific symposium entitled “Seeing for Action—Using Maps and Graphs to Protect the Public’s Health” will take place.

Acknowledgements

Places & Spaces: Mapping Science is curated by the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center at Indiana University. In Atlanta, the exhibition is presented by the David J. Sencer CDC Museum and CDC's Office of Public Health Scientific Services, with additional support from Thomson Reuters through the CDC foundation.


Funding for Places & Spaces is provided by the National Science Foundation under grants IIS-023826, CHE-052466, IIS-O534909, and IIS-0715303; the James S. McDonnell Foundation; and Thomson Reuters. Additional funding and technical expertise comes from the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, the Pervasive Technology Institute, and the School of Informatics and Computing—all three located at Indiana University. Some of the data used to generate science maps is from Thomson Reuters and Elsevier. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation or other sponsors.

Thomson Reuters CDC Foundation Indiana University Bloomington
Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center National Science Foundation Elsevier James S. McDonnell Foundation

Acknowledgements: This exhibit is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. IIS-0238261, CHE-0524661, IIS-0534909 and IIS-0715303, the James S. McDonnell Foundation; Thomson Reuters; the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, University Information Technology Services, and the School of Library and Information Science, all three at Indiana University. Some of the data used to generate the science maps is from the Web of Science by Thomson Reuters and Scopus by Elsevier. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.