Iteration X (2014): The Future of Science Mapping

Four Existing Maps

X.1

X.3

X.2

X.4

Six Science Maps

X.5

X.7

X.9

X.6

X.8

X.10

This 10th and final iteration aims to inspire continuous innovation and the utilization of science mapping by featuring visualizations of:

  • Physics—from the 6th century B.C. to the present—to communicate key theoretical starting points, streams of thought and well-known diagrams.
  • The Internet with old and new continents of websites and services.
  • Emerging pandemic threats in the developing world for early detection of viruses from wildlife with pandemic potential.
  • Roman transportation that shows the impact of geography and seasonality on transportation time, costs, and the dominance of cities.
  • Money to illustrate possession and expenditure from dollars to trillions of dollars.
  • Citation contexts to provide insight on the internal organization of scientific papers.
  • Funding portfolios to compare and coordinate funding efforts across agencies.
  • Graphene publications and patents to help illustrate innovation dynamics in support of business and policy decision-making.
  • Altruism to understand the commonalities with and differences from scientific activities.
  • Interstitial organizations that create bridges between civic ideals, managerial concepts, and scientific assessment.
Please enjoy the maps then map your very own data.


Acknowledgements: This exhibit is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. IIS-0238261, CHE-0524661, IIS-0534909 and IIS-0715303, the James S. McDonnell Foundation; Thomson Reuters; the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, University Information Technology Services, and the School of Library and Information Science, all three at Indiana University. Some of the data used to generate the science maps is from the Web of Science by Thomson Reuters and Scopus by Elsevier. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.