II.1 U.S. Frequency Allocations Chart

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National Telecommunications and Information Administration

The Spectrum Chart of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) of the United States Department of Commerce, also known as the U.S. Frequency Allocations Wall Chart, depicts the radio frequency spectrum allocations to radio services operated within the United States. The chart graphically partitions the radio frequency spectrum—extending from 3 kilohertz (kHz) to 300 gigahertz (GHz)—into more than 450 frequency bands. Color-coding distinguishes the allocations for the 30 different radio services. This chart helps widely diverse audiences gain a general understanding of U.S. domestic spectrum allocation policies. The chart depicts the allocation decisions that were made by the NTIA and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) up to July 1, 2003; it replaces a similar chart printed by NTIA in 1996. U.S. domestic spectrum uses may differ from international allocations that comply with international regulations or bilateral agreements. Background information is available at http://ntia.doc.gov/osmhome/allochrt.html.


References:

National Telecommunications and Information Administration. 2003. U.S. Frequency Allocation Chart. Accessed July 15, 2007. http://www.ntia.doc.gov/osmhome/Allochrt.html.

National Telecommunications and Information Administration. 2003. U.S. Frequency Allocations Charts, by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. Courtesy of the Office of Spectrum Management. In “2nd Iteration (2006): The Power of Reference Systems,” Places & Spaces: Mapping Science, edited by Katy Börner and Deborah MacPherson. http://scimaps.org.

Acknowledgements: This exhibit is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. IIS-0238261, CHE-0524661, IIS-0534909 and IIS-0715303, the James S. McDonnell Foundation; Thomson Reuters; the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, University Information Technology Services, and the School of Library and Information Science, all three at Indiana University. Some of the data used to generate the science maps is from the Web of Science by Thomson Reuters and Scopus by Elsevier. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.