Places & Spaces at Vanderbilt University

January 23 - April 23, 2017

Beginning January 23, 2017, Vanderbilt University will feature the Places & Spaces: Mapping Science exhibition, which makes a beautiful case for the importance of data visualization.

The Places & Spaces exhibition showcases the visualization of complex data in innovative and beautiful formats, using groundbreaking methods for making sense of large streams of data. Each year new visualizations are added, culled from international and interdisciplinary submissions. Four new macroscopes have been chosen to travel with the exhibition, and will make their debut at Vanderbilt University.

These four macroscopes use data that varies tremendously in terms of subject matter and method of collection: city smells found on social media, a library collection mapped in time and space, institutional partnerships revealed through publications, and ship locations tracked by satellite. However, they all present data visually to make new perspectives possible.

The macroscopes will join the 100 maps of science, sculpture, and hands on activities that currently comprise the exhibition. The exhibition will be on display in the Central Library, Sarratt Student Center | Rand Hall, and the Wond'ry.

Venues:

Sarratt Student Center | Rand Hall
West Side Row
Nashville TN 37240

Central Library
419 21st Ave S
Nashville, TN 37240

The Wond'ry
2414 Highland Avenue, Suite 102
Nashville, TN 37240

Special Events:

  • Friday, January 27 - Reception. Katy Börner, curator of Places & Spaces will deliver the inaugural lecture, “Maps & Macroscopes” in the Central Library Community Room, 3-4 p.m.

Workshops held at the Wond'ry at the Innovation Pavilion

  • Tuesday, February 7 - Creating Illustrations and Figures with Inkscape, 11 a.m.
  • Wednesday, February 8 - Interactive Data Analysis with R & ggvis, 11 a.m.
  • Thursday, February 9 - Visualizing Data with Tableau, 11 a.m.
  • Thursday, March 16 - Using a GoPro Camera, 11 a.m.
  • Wednesday, March 22 - The Artistic, Scientific, and Political Impact of Drone Technology: A Panel Discussion with Artist Tivon Rice, 11 a.m

Competition

  • April 2017 - Undergraduate, graduate, and professional students compete for the best data visualization.

Acknowledgments:

Places & Spaces: Mapping Science is curated by Dr. Katy Börner and Lisel Record at the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University. Places & Spaces also receives input from its Advisory Board. Elizabeth Boyd and Celia Walker are organizing the exhibit at Vanderbilt University. Support from Vanderbilt University comes from the Central Library and the Wild Bunch Fund.


Funding for Places & Spaces is provided by the National Science Foundation under grants IIS-0238261, CHE-0524661, IIS-O534909, and IIS-0715303; the James S. McDonnell Foundation; and Thomson Reuters. Additional funding comes from the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, University Information Technology Services, and the School of Informatics and Computing—all three located at Indiana University. Some of the data used to generate science maps is from Thomson Reuters and Elsevier. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation or other sponsors.

Acknowledgements: This exhibit is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. IIS-0238261, CHE-0524661, IIS-0534909 and IIS-0715303, the James S. McDonnell Foundation; Thomson Reuters; the Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center, University Information Technology Services, and the School of Library and Information Science, all three at Indiana University. Some of the data used to generate the science maps is from the Web of Science by Thomson Reuters and Scopus by Elsevier. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.